Installing the Hiri Outlook365/Exchange Email Client on ChromeOS via Crostini

If you are normally a Linux user who has ever worked in an office that uses Office365 or Exchange, you will likely have heard of the Hiri email client. Hiri is one of the most robust Office 635 / Microsoft Exchange email clients on the market. Getting Hiri to run on ChromeOS via Project Crostini is pretty simple so lets get started.

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Additional Changes to ChromeOS 68.0.3440.4 – Android Files in ChromeOS File Manager and Crostini to Select ARM64 Devices

I wrote an article yesterday highlighting some of the changes to ChromeOS 68.0.3440.4 however it turns out that I completely missed two major features. This build of ChromeOS finally brings one of the most requested features to ChromeOS – The ability to easily access your Android Filesystem from within the ChromeOS File Manager and more.

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ChromeOS 68.0.3440.4 Brings Hostname Resolution to Project Crostini

ChromeOS 68.0.3440.4 was released a few hours ago and it seems like a small update, likely heavy on under the hood bug fixes but very light on changes as far as I can tell after playing with it for a few hours. Here are all of the changes I could find:

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ChromeOS 68.0.3437.0 Brings Shared Clipboards and The Ability To Access Linux Filesystems To The ChromeOS File Manager

ChromeOS 68.0.3437.0 was released for Pixelbook owners on the “dev” channel on Wednesday and it brings several changes and bug fixes. I have spent the past few days playing around with this release and here is what has changed:

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Can You Run Steam on ChromeOS via Project Crostini??? I Don’t See Why Not?

The Steam platform is one of the most popular distribution platforms for PC Gamers and it turns out that you can indeed run the Linux version of Steam on your Pixelbook. I cannot say for sure that all games will run on it but you should be able to install any game that supports “Linux” on your Chromebook. I apologize in advanced for lost productivity caused by following the steps in this guide – you have been warned!

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ChromeOS 68.0.3431.0 Brings The Ability To Pin Linux Applications To The Shelf

Heads up all Pixelbook Owners, ChromeOS 68.0.3431.0 is currently being pushed to those who are in the “dev” channel. It seems like Google has made several changes to the bottom dock (shelf) such as removing the Profile Photo, moving persistent notifications and allowing the ability to pin Linux applications to the shelf.

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Running Visual Studio Code on ChromeOS via Project Crostini

I wrote instructions last week on how to get Android Studio to run on ChomeOS via Project Crostini and since then, I have received several requests from readers asking if it is possible to get Microsoft’s Visual Studio Code running on ChromeOS. The answer is yes and here are the instructions

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Just How Vanilla is Debian in Project Crostini on ChromeOS?

When the public got wind that Google was working on bringing Linux Applications to ChromeOS, some got worried that Google was going to create a proprietary and locked down distribution to run applications on. Fortunately this does not appear to be the case but what exactly is custom about the Google build of Debian? It tuns out the answer is not much.

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Troubleshooting and Working With Linux in Project Crostini

Project Crostini is Google’s ambitious plan to bring a full Linux desktop environment to ChromeOS. While this move will mainly cater to developers, I suspect it will be a pretty compelling feature for the general consumer market in the future (can anyone sat Steam on ChromeOS?). While the Beta of Project Crostini is pretty nice, it lacks a easy way to manage and troubleshoot common issues. This guide was put together to help with some basic maintenance and troubleshooting steps that I have come across over the past few days:

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